Saturday, September 14, 2019

The Last Bale...







This morning, when I stepped out the door to begin the daily ritual of watering the gardens, the Orb Weaver on the Shanty's little porch, was already taking down last night's web.  Hummingbirds were darting here and there about the garden, seemingly more intent on feeding than they were on me.  Their time here is done.  It's time to go.  Many already have.  Migration is a serious thing and they know it.  Even the minutest bit of mass and energy can determine whether they make it, or they don't.  I hope they do.  All of them.

I noticed this morning, as I went about the gardens that there's beginning to be a bit of color showing up in the foliage.  Some of it has, no doubt, been brought on by the lack of rain the past several weeks, but the days are growing shorter and fall is knocking on the door.

I am taking advantage of the dryness to clean up as I water.  Roots of plants that don't belong in a garden give up easily in dry, sandy soil.  Thus, there's a garden hose in one hand, and a weed in the other.  I am ripping out old vegetables, and only holding off on flowers that are looking quite weary and worn, until the last butterfly has fluttered away.






During summer, I don't take many blooms and blossoms  from the gardens.  Every time I pick up my shears to cut a bouquet, it seems each flower is crying out, "Don't take me."   And, I think of the butterflies and the bees that might find food there.  But, now, with the growing season almost over, I have been bringing in flowers from the fields and gardens to dry.  How nice it is to have a pretty bouquet on a cold winter's day!






It has been a big week here on the farm.  The last of the hay has been baled.  Yay, for that last bale! We were entertained that day in the fields by a couple of young coyotes who were intent on finding their dinner on the newly mown field - perhaps a field mouse or rat.  One of the coyotes was a very pretty reddish brown, but I never got an opportunity to get his picture.








"...Slowing down,
time will come
A flutter of falling leaves,
short waves of heat,
strong winds,
migrating birds,
The fruits of summer, stung by wasps,
bitten by squirrels,
will be gone. "

~Bread on the Water

24 comments:

lil red hen said...

Hopefully our last bale has been made! Now we're in the process of hauling them in, over very rough, dusty roads, and the collection of bales grows bigger with each load. Marigolds are about the only color I have left and plans for next spring are racing through my mind, hoping storms don't mess things up like this year. The yard is beginning to look better.

happyone said...

The pictures are lovely. I always like to see bales of hay in fields.

Lady Locust said...

How picturesque! I haven't seen a hummer for a couple days now. I brought in the feeders a except one, to clean up before winter. Will pull the last in a day or two.

jenclair said...

The picture of your flowers drying is beautiful and promises a hint of summer even when the weather turns cold and blustery. Thanks for the idea--I'm going to see if I can't hang a few in the attic. And the mown fields make me think of those "wee, sleekit, cowrin' beastie[s]" that have sheltered there. At our camp, however, they usually manage to find a way inside and into mischief!

Faith said...

Enjoyed my visit again. :) There is something very lovely about the dried flowers in a vase, or hanging to dry. So simple, and lovely. I captured some flowers only as they were beginning to dry on their own, for the seeds. I left the few little ones I have in bloom, mostly Zinnia for the bees and flutterbys. Leaves are beginning to change here in NE Ohio. It's slow and subtle, I hope it is a nice slow process so we can enjoy all the beauty.

Vintage Keepsakes said...

You have had dry weather...when we had a wet week. My DIL has a rain gauge that showed they easily got four inches of rain. This week the sun will shine and the sky will remain dry. Maybe the good farmers will have a chance to bale that hay! You have some amazing views to enjoy that changing scenery that the season's bring. I love seeing your dried flowers and your pretty flower arrangement; enjoying your summer's bounty once again. We have so many yellow leaves on our trees. One windy day I watched as those leaves were falling from the tree; reminding me that before too long all the leaves on those trees will once again be gone.

Eggs In My Pocket said...

It is getting cooler here and you are right......everything has a time for migration. How pretty your photos always are. I was given a bouquet of carnations the other day and I am just about to dry them. They are so pretty.....I can never throw such things away!

Yesteryear Embroideries said...

lovely post! It is getting cooler here....still have some hot days. By the way, I love your comment about your "unfinished piece" you gave to your daughter. What a great idea!

Hill Top Post said...

Ah, throwing in a bit of Robert Burns here... I had to look it up! I love it!

Hill Top Post said...

Yes, we must take care of those bees and flutterbys! :~)

Hill Top Post said...

It was a bumpy start this year, for sure. We are still cleaning up fallen trees. At least there will be an ample supply of wood for our winter's fires.

Hill Top Post said...

But, now the last bale has been hauled away...

Hill Top Post said...

Thursday was a big feeding day here, then on Friday the leaving began in earnest. I will miss them.

Hill Top Post said...

Wow, could we ever use four inches of rain!! We are hoping this weather pattern will break soon, maybe by next weekend. I am going to bring in more zinnias but this time I am going to dry them upright so the petals don't droop downward. Happy fall, Sandra!

Hill Top Post said...

I should think carnations would dry beautifully. I have a closet with some space where I can dry flowers in the dark. They seem to keep more color that way.

Rose said...

I so enjoy your posts...love seeing all those bales. We ran into some regular size square bales last week, but most had been picked up. Remember the day when they were loaded and unloaded by hand? And we could carry them out by hand, or throw them down, or do whatever under our own power? I love to see coyotes but seldom do...

Hill Top Post said...

You did notice that I said "old" didn't you? It had been so many years since I had stitched on the piece.

Hill Top Post said...

Oh, yes, Rose, how well I remember those square bales. When we first married, we made a little extra cash each summer by hauling hay. My first paying job was for my brother who paid me a penny a bale to drive the truck for him while he loaded hay. I think he got ten cents a bale.

Kim said...

I smiled at the thought of coyotes visiting your place. An unfamiliar sight for one who lives down here. Fall whispering to you there, while Spring is beginning to dance here. How I love to visit your beautiful place and read your soulful words and gaze upon your photos of your daily life. I too, hope your Hummingbirds make it to their warmer place.

Prims By The Water said...

We have coyotes here and at night can hear them howl. Last bale was always good when baling hay on my grandparents farm. Janice

The Joy of Home with Martha Ellen said...

Your drying flowers reminds me to do the same, Mary. I love seeing the bales of hay in your field. That photo is lovely! The hummers are on their way--you describe it all so beautifully.

Quilting Babcia said...

So happy to have found your new blog so I can begin following again. That probably wouldn't have happened if you hadn't left your sweet comment about my grandson's quilt, so thank you!

acorn hollow said...

I am old enough to remember tramping hay for my grandfather. Laying in the hay for the ride back to the barn. Thank you for your sweet visit
Cathy

Dianna said...

Your flowers are lovely! I wish I could watch your spider taking down its web.